Sunday, March 8, 2009

Recipe: Broiled Rack of Lamb

If you love the taste of lamb, then rack of lamb is like a little slice of heaven (complete with rib bones).

Generally, I'm a fan of grilling my rack of lamb outside on the Weber kettle. But as often as not, I don't have that kind of time. In these situations, I bust out the cast iron grill pan.

When the grill pan is properly pre-heated it gives you beautiful grill lines, but with the added benefit that you don't have to leave your house.

Speaking of added benefits... this recipe is simple, simple, simple!

The only part of it that requires any attention to detail is timing. And even timing is made vastly simpler by the advent of the digital meat thermometer.


Ingredients

  • 1 rack of lamb (frenched, ideally)
  • Olive oil
  • Salt, Pepper, and Rosemary
Procedure
Preheat a cast iron grill pan, grill side up, under your broiler (top shelf) for 10 minutes. While the grill pan is heating, liberally salt and pepper your rack of lamb all over. Then add a bit of olive oil, and slather things around to coat the lamb evenly.

Sprinkle a bit of dried rosemary on all sides, but not too much. 30 leaves of rosemary is plenty.

Once the grill pan is hot and smoking, slap down the rack of lamb, bone side up. To get the most aesthetic grill lines, angle the rack about 45 degrees on the grill pan.

Let the rack broil for 5-6 minutes. Turn the rack over, and then broil for another 5-6 minutes. At this time, take the rack's temperature—on the inner-most piece of meat, away from any rib bones. From here on out, measure the temperature of the meat every time you flip it (about every 4 minutes). You're measuring not just the temperature of the meat, but the speed with which that temperature is rising.

For rare (recommended), pull the rack from the oven once the internal temperature (in the middle of the rack) has reached 120 degrees F. Place it on a cutting board, and tent it with aluminum foil for 10 minutes, and then cut and serve immediately. If you like medium rare, pull it at 130 degrees F. If you like it any more cooked than medium rare, save your money and buy hot dogs instead.