Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Recipe: Quick Tuna Salad Over Mixed Greens

Tuna salad over summer greens
This recipe has absolutely nothing to do with cast iron cookware. But it's tasty and quick, and I just had to share.

Some version of this recipe serves as dinner at least one night a week during summer when we don't want to heat up the house by cooking. This time of year the garden is also bursting with greens, cherry tomatoes, and other goodies.

You can adjust quantities depending on how hungry you are.

This recipe serves 2, and takes about 5 minutes to make.

Ingredients
For the tuna salad

  • 10-12 oz. canned tuna, drained
  • 1-2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
  • 1 stick of celery, finely chopped
  • a small wedge of onion, finely chopped (roughly 1 tablespoon of chopped onion)
  • cracked black pepper
  • salt

For the green salad

  • a pile of mixed greens or mesclun
  • juice from 1/2 lemon
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • cracked black pepper
Procedure
Drain your tuna, and then add the mayonnaise, dijon mustard, chopped celery and onion. Mix things around to combine. Salt and pepper the tuna to taste. It should burst with flavor. You can also add finely chopped pickles and/or dill if it suits your fancy. 

Wash your mixed greens and spin them dry. Drizzle the greens with perhaps a tablespoon of olive oil, and then squeeze in the juice from your half-lemon. Again, salt and pepper the greens to taste as you toss them around. The dressed salad should taste good on its own. 

Arrange your mixed greens on plates, and add half of the tuna salad mixture in the enter of the pile of mixed greens. I happened to have some fresh cherry tomatoes from the garden, so I tossed those on as well. 

Serve immediately. 


2 comments:

  1. Hey D -- what do you recommend for canned tuna? Is there a particular brand to look for that is sustainable, low mercury, etc? -- Campbell

    ReplyDelete
  2. The best choices are albacore and skipjack tuna. A lot of the canned tuna is albacore. Some places you can find troll or pole caught albacore, and a lot of skipjack is troll/poll caught (which is the most sustainable fishing method). These methods also tend to catch smaller fish, which keeps mercury levels lower.

    Sad what we've done to our oceans...

    -D

    ReplyDelete

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